City Landmarks – Karachi’s largest Cross

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Gora Qabrustan is a personal favorite. And now it is home to the largest cross not only in Karachi or Pakistan but entire Asia. A christian businessman has funded its construction as a symbol of hope for Christians in the country where they are often marginalized.

Gora Qabrustan can be conveniently accessed through Kala Pul or Sharah-e-faisal. While the main gate opens on Sharah-e-faisal, it is almost impossible to find parking space on the busy thoroughfare. Therefore it is advised to park the car in front of the gate opening up on Kala Pul road, under the shadow of still under construction cross.

From a distance it does not look out of ordinary but its only when you pass under its shadow that you realize the height of the cross. I am with a curious friend who wants to take photos of the cross. On a weekday we only find couple of workers taking a break. The work still continues as workers put marble tiles on the cross. We take the photos refraining from talking to workers fearing that they may stop us from taking photos. We finish the job quickly and continue walking inside to see ancient graves up close.

The graveyard is in much better condition as wild grass has been removed but the garbage is still being thrown from the settlement behind the graveyard. Someone has thrown red color over one of Karachi walla’s favorite statues in Gora Qabrustan. It turns the mood somber. Hope that the newly built Cross delivers on its promise. Hope for the marginalized.

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2 Comments on “City Landmarks – Karachi’s largest Cross”

  1. January 27, 2016 at 9:43 pm #

    Thank you for taking us inside the Gora Qabrastan, but the garbage strewn all over where the angel with some red paint on its face stands has immensely saddened me. Though that colour looks ominous, but one is still hopeful about the symbolism of the cross that you refer to.

  2. May 26, 2016 at 3:52 pm #

    The pictures elicit a sad feeling, but good documentation.

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